Kimon Keramidas
Bard Graduate Center
Interface Design: Thinking About Technology in Daily Life and in the Gallery

Date

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Time

1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Place

38 West 86th Street, Seminar Room

Open to BGC faculty, staff, and students only.

Description

Kimon Keramidas will be speaking at a Works in Progress Seminar on Tuesday, December 10, 2013, from 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm.  His talk is entitled, “Interface Design: Thinking About Technology in Daily Life and in the Gallery.”

Within the history of computing, the last thirty years have been defined by the ascendance of the personal computer, a series of devices that finally brought the power of computation out of laboratories and corporate technology centers and into the purview of the individual user. This thirty-year period has seen a blur of technological advances in both hardware and software as computers have gotten smaller, faster, more powerful, and more complex in their capabilities. In fact, so much has happened so quickly and been so dramatic in its effect on everyday life that we often forget to think about just how we have interacted with these machines over time and how those interactions have come to define our experiences with these machines.

In his talk, Keramidas will discuss work that is currently being done for an upcoming Focus Gallery exhibition, tentatively titled “The Interface Experience: Thirty Years of Personal Computer Use.” This exhibition aims not only to gather and present objects, but also to put the experience of using those objects on display. As such, the show will consider the various ways that crafting and designing an exhibition can allow one to come to a better understanding of the interaction between hardware, software, and computer user. Along with a discussion of the primary objects and secondary references that form the historical corpus of the exhibition, theoretical display and interactive possibilities will be discussed, as they will be key to creating a dynamic, experiential, and interactive environment for gallery visitors.


Works in Progress Seminar