BGC Gallery
Gallery Programs
Special Events
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Research Institute
Alumni Spotlight
Edible Books
April at the BGC

This month, our long-awaited Salvaging the Past: Georges Hoentschel and French Decorative Arts from The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened in the Main Gallery along with Confluences: An American Expedition to Northern Burma, 1935 in the Focus Gallery.

Read below about our Accepted Students Day and learn about the continuing accomplishments of BGC alumni. You will also find information on this month's Iris Awards luncheon, a listing of Gallery Programs as well as the Research Institute's seminars, symposia, and lectures.  And, don't miss the pictures from our Second Annual Edible Book Festival!

BGC Gallery
Main Gallery
Salvaging the Past: Georges Hoentschel and French Decorative Arts from The Metropolitan Museum of Art
April 4 - August 11, 2013

Focusing on a remarkable but little-known collection that entered The Metropolitan Museum of Art as a gift of J. Pierpont Morgan in the early twentieth century—indeed, it precipitated the building of a new wing—this exhibition features medieval art and French eighteenth-century paneling, furniture, metalwork, textiles, paintings, and sculpture, as well as late nineteenth-century art pottery, most of which have rarely been viewed since the 1950s. Read more.

In the Press
The Magazine Antiques

The New York Times


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Focus Gallery
Confluences: An American Expedition to Northern Burma, 1935
Through August 3, 2013

In January 1935, the Vernay-Hopwood Chindwin Expedition set out from Rangoon to explore the upper reaches of the “mighty Chindwin River” on behalf of the American Museum of Natural History. The exhibition explores the complex social life of this extraordinary enterprise through an assortment of objects that were both carried into the field and collected en route. Read more.

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Gallery Programs
Upcoming Events
Evening for Educators
Thursday, April 11,  4:00 – 6:00 pm 
Teachers, administrators, teaching artists, and parents are invited to meet colleagues and enjoy private tours of our two new exhibitions. Learn about our exciting new outreach suitcases and receive complimentary lesson plans. An optional dinner, featuring traditional Burmese fare, will be offered for $25 per person. Register here

Study Day: Revelations in Conservation: The Georges Hoentschel Collection
Friday, April 26, 9:30 am – 4:30 pm
This study day focuses on the conservation of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French decorative arts, including metalwork, upholstery, and woodwork from the Hoentschel collection. This program begins at the BGC and concludes with a visit to a conservation studio at the Metropolitan Museum. Register here.

Gallery Talk and Wine Tasting: Illuminating Hoentschel: A French Tastemaker and His World
Thursday, May 2, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Ulrich Leben, a curator of the Hoentschel exhibition, will discuss the recent research that illuminates the scope of Hoentschel’s contributions and singular place that his collection presents as a research tool for the international dissemination of “French taste.” A tasting featuring new French wines will conclude the program. Register here

Family Day: A Journey through Burma
Saturday, May 4, 11:30 am – 4:00 pm
Explore the music and stories of Burma (now called Myanmar) during this special family day. Hear a performance of traditional Burmese music and create a travel map for a journey through Burma’s lush landscape. Register here.

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Special Events
Iris Awards Luncheon
On April 17, the Bard Graduate Center will honor outstanding contributions to patronage and scholarship in the decorative arts at the 17th Annual Iris Foundation Awards Luncheon. This year's honorees are Richard Jenrette, Morrison H. Heckscher, Glenn Adamson, and Adrian Sassoon.  Proceeds will support students through the BGC Scholarship Fund. Read more.
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Degree Programs
Accepted Students Day
The Accepted Students Day on March 20, provided an opportunity for the BGC to welcome many of the students who will enter in the Fall of 2013. Read more.
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Research Institute
Upcoming Seminars, Symposia, and Lectures
Seminars, symposia, and lectures have made the BGC a major venue for advanced intellectual discussion in New York City.  As an expression of the range of methods and approaches for studying the cultural history of the material world, they function alongside course offerings to present to our students the possible scope of their own research and future work.


Seminar in Renaissance and Early Modern Material Culture
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 6 to 8 pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Rebecca Zorach
Art History, University of Chicago
“Friedman's Pencil and Kant's Tattoo: Graphic Arts, Global Utopias, and the Acheiropoetic Social”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/-818.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

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Modern Design History Seminar
Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 6 to 8 pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Alexandra Lange
Design Criticism, School of Visual Arts
“Founding Mothers: Architecture Criticism from Mariana Van Rensselaer to Esther McCoy, Ada Louise Huxtable, and Jane Jacobs”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/-819.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

***

Keynote Lecture: Hoentschel in Context
Thursday, April 18, 2013, 6 to 8 pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Flaminia Gennari-Santori
Consulting Curator, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, Miami, Florida
“’There Was Money in the Air’: John Pierpont Morgan and the European Collecting Tradition”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at www.bgc.bard.edu/news/upcoming-events/-626.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

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Symposium: Hoentschel in Context
Friday, April 19, 2013, 9:30am to 5pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Thomas Stammers
Lecturer in the Cultural History of Modern Europe, University of Durham
“Reinventing the Old Regime: Collectors and Scavengers in Nineteenth-Century Paris”

Anne Forray-Carlier
Chief Curator, Department of 17th and 18th Centuries,
Musée des Arts Décoratifs
“Émile Peyre: The Unknown Collector”

Evelyne Possémé
Chief Curator, Department of Art Nouveau, Art Déco, and Jewelry,
Musée des Arts Décoratifs
“Hoentschel’s Pavilion for the Exposition Universelle of 1900, Then and Now”

Charlotte Vignon
Associate Curator of Decorative Arts, The Frick Collection
“French Style in Early Twentieth-Century America: The Roles of Art Dealers and Interior Decorators”

Vincent Bouvet
Head of the Publication Department, École Nationale Supérieure
des Arts Décoratifs, Paris
“Hoentschel and his Contemporaries: Parisian Interior Design Firms (1880-1920)”

Christina Hagelskamp, Mecka Baumeister, Nancy Britton, Beth Edelstein, and Pascale Patris
Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation,
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
“The Conservator’s Perspective: Case Studies from the Furniture and Furnishings in the Hoentschel Collection”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/-850.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

***

Symposium: Kitchen and Table in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America
Monday, April 29, 2013, 9:30am to 6pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Deborah L. Krohn
Bard Graduate Center
“Introduction: Places, Spaces, Things and Ideas”

Allen Grieco
Senior Research Associate, Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies
“Salts and Salt Cellars on the Renaissance Table”

Melissa Calaresu
History, Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge
“Street Food: Eating Out in Early Modern Europe”

Bernie L. Herman
American Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
“Food Silences: Kitchen and Table in Early Modern British America”

Janine E. Skerry
Curator of Metals, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
“Were ‘English Goods Ever the Best’?: Recreating the Past at Colonial Williamsburg”

Sara Pennell
Humanities, Roehampton University
“What's Not Cooking in the Early Modern English Kitchen: Alternative Readings of an 'Everyday' Space”

Ivan Day
Independent Writer
“Displaying the Kitchen and Table”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/-895.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

***

Ravi and Seran Trehan Lectures in Islamic Art and Material Culture
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 6 to 8pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

David Roxburgh
Islamic Art History, Harvard University
“Baysunghur’s Garden Party and Other Tales: Conceptualizing Artistic and Cultural Production in Early Timurid Herat”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/upcoming-events/-820.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

***

The Joan Stacke Graham Lectures
Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 6 to 8 pm
Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street
212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Gaye Blake-Roberts
Director, Wedgwood Museum
“Wedgwood Majolica—A Response to Fashion”

RSVP is required. Please reserve your place at http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/upcoming-events/-26.html or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.  

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Alumni Spotlight
Einav Zamir
Read more.

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Edible Books
The BGC Library participated in the International Edible Book Festival for the second year in a row on Wednesday, April 3.

The BGC community was encouraged to participate in this appropriately decorative arts and design–centric celebration.  Participants brought foods based on book titles, authors, and cover designs. Many contestants chose to represent books from the BGC Library’s collection. It was a pleasure to see on display the playful pride and affection our community has for particular books in the collection.

BGC students, faculty, and staff from all departments arrived throughout the day to view and judge the submissions. They cast votes for the most appetizing entry, the best play on words, the best interpretation of the theme (i.e. the best “book”), and finally the best in show. 

A blackberry cream cake by Karyn Hinkle representing Bee Wilson’s new book Consider the Fork was deemed “most appetizing,” while a clever group project by Christine Griffiths, Andrew Goodman, and Nicole Pulichene was “best play on words.” They used Alfred Gell’s classic anthropology text, Art and Agency, to create an apple TART and Agency with apricot “Gelly”!

Janis Ekdahl’s Book of Tea, hand-bound with packaged tea bags as the “pages,” was runner up in the “best book / best interpretation of the theme” category, but the winner of that award as well as winner of “best in show” by an overwhelming margin was Corrine Brandt’s incredible submission based on the late eighteenth century tract American Cookery. Corrine’s tidy and impossibly tiny hand-piping in toothpick-thin chocolate letters awed all who saw it, and truly embodied the spirit of Edible Books.  See the photos.


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