Event/Speaker

Symposium: Circus and the City: New York, 1793-2010

Date

Monday, October 15, 2012

Time

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Place

38 West 86th Street

212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Description

This half-day symposium is being held in conjunction with the Circus and the City exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center.  The exhibition is made possible, in part, with support from the Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts and anonymous donors.  The symposium focuses on the animals and performers that made the circus into such a spectacular and iconic form of entertainment in the United States. Brett Mizelle, “Contesting the Circus in American History: Animal Exhibitions and the Emergence of Animal Welfare,” historicizes debates over the legitimacy of the circus and charts the evolving relationship between the American public and animals over the course of the nineteenth century. Janet M. Davis, “Circus Queen in New York City: Flight, Spectacle, and the Fantastical Life of Tiny Kline,” uses the varied career of performer Tiny Kline to explore the world of popular amusements in the city during the early decades of the twentieth century. The symposium showcases the rich history and cultural legacy of the circus in New York City, and the two speakers will be joined by exhibition curator Matthew Wittmann, who will provide commentary.

Brett Mizelle
(California State University, Long Beach)
“Contesting the Circus in American History: Animal Exhibitions and the Emergence of Animal Welfare”

Janet M. Davis
(University of Texas at Austin)
“Circus Queen in New York City: Flight, Spectacle, and the Fantastical Life of Tiny Kline”

 

RSVP is required. Please click on the registration link at the bottom of this page or contact academicevents@bgc.bard.edu.

PLEASE NOTE that our Lecture Hall can only accommodate a limited number of people, so please come early if you would like to have a seat in the main room.  We also have overflow seating available; all registrants who arrive late will be seated in the overflow area.


Academic Programs, Symposia