Gallery Media

"Circus and the City" curator Matthew Wittmann discusses one of the exhibition's featured items, a trunk lined with a circus broadside by Chester Elsworth from 1828. Watch Circus Trunk: A Study in Mobility, a video by Han Vu.

How the Universe is Wired: Dorothea Rockburne on Mandelbrot and the Working Process

On October 8, 2012 artist Dorothea Rockburne visited the BGC Focus Gallery. In this video, she discusses her longstanding interest in mathematics, and her memories of meeting Benoit Mandelbrot. Watch How the Universe is Wired, a video by Han Vu.

The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking

From September 21, 2012 to January 27, 2013, the BGC presents The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking in the Focus Gallery. Watch In the Service of Mathematics, a video by Han Vu.

Hats Off With Stephen Jones

The milliner extraordinaire reflects on four of his favorite hats as the exhibition Hats: An Anthology by Stephen Jones he co-curated with Oriole Cullen leaves the BGC Gallery and moves to the next venue at the Peabody Essex Museum. Film by Han Vu. Watch Hats Off with Stephen Jones here.

Staging Fashion, 1880–1920: Jane Hading, Lily Elsie, Billie Burke

From January 18 to April 8, 2012, the BGC presents Staging Fashion, 1880–1920: Jane Hading, Lily Elsie, Billie Burke in the Focus Gallery. The exhibition is curated by Michele Majer, BGC assistant professor and research associate at Cora Ginsburg LLC, in collaboration with several BGC graduate students. Watch an interview with Michele Majer, featuring images from the exhibition.

American Christmas Cards, 1900–1960

From September 21 to December 31, 2011, the Bard Graduate Center presented American Christmas Cards, 1900–1960 in our Focus Gallery. The exhibition was organized by Kenneth L. Ames, a member of the BGC faculty, working in collaboration with graduate students. Watch two videos featuring details from the exhibition.

Objects of Exchange: Social and Material Transformation on the Late Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast

In the process of developing the exhibition (which ran from January 26, 2011 to April 17, 2011), curator Aaron Glass conducted a number of conversations with First Nations artists and scholars during which they discussed the selected objects and the show’s historical themes. These field recordings were available to students during their research and subsequent video interviews were conducted for the website. Watch the interviews with First Nations artists.

Cloisonné: Chinese Enamels from the Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties

From January 26 through April 17, 2011, the Bard Graduate Center presents Cloisonné: Chinese Enamels from the Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties. The exhibition, a collaboration between the BGC and the Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris, is the first to bring cloisonné from this renowned French collection together with objects from important public collections in the United States. Watch Modern Cloisonné Manufacturing Technique.

Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick

From September 18, 2009– January 24, 2010, the BGC presented Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick. This extraordinary conversation between Natalie Zemon Davis and Dean Peter Miller introduces the range of curatorial and historical issues that animated the exhibition. Watch About an Inventory: A Conversation Between Natalie Zemon Davis and Peter N. Miller.

English Embroidery from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, ca. 1580–1700: 'Twixt Art and Nature

Running from December 11, 2008 – April 12, 2009, English Embroidery from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, ca. 1580–1700: ’Twixt Art and Nature was the third exhibition resulting from a collaboration between the BGC and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Watch The Art of Embroidery.

From July 17 to November 16, 2008, Bard Graduate Center presented Thomas Hope: Regency Designer. This exhibition was first on view at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London from March 22 to June 22, 2008; it was the second in a series of exhibitions organized by the Bard Graduate Center to be shown at the V&A. Watch Duchess Street and Deepdene.

Shaker Design: Out of This World was an exploration of 200 years of Shaker design and spirituality. In addition—and for the first time in a major exhibition—Shaker Design illustrated the Shaker influence on diverse contemporary design, including Scandinavian furniture and the work of George Nakashima. Watch In the Spirit and Creating Heaven on Earth.

This comprehensive exhibition was the first devoted solely to Stuart, and its accompanying catalogue (produced by the Bard Graduate Center and Yale University Press) finally brought attention to the life and extraordinary work of this important architect and designer. The assemblage of 150 works came from a variety of public and private collections in the United States and Great Britain. Watch Country Houses, Spencer House, and Monuments.

Lions, Dragons, and Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, the second exhibition resulting from a collaboration between Bard Graduate Center and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, featured the Metropolitan’s superb collection of medieval aquamanilia. Watch Lions, Dragons, and Other Beasts.

American Streamlined Design: The World of Tomorrow

From March 16, 2005 to June 11, 2005, the Bard Graduate Center presented American Streamlined Design: The World of Tomorrow an extremely comprehensive selection of 180 objects, including furniture, ceramics, metalwork, plastic, and graphic design, as well as original drawings and book designs. Although it focused on the 1930s and ‘40s, the period during which streamlined design developed in the United States, the exhibition also presented streamlining in design today. Watch The World of Tomorrow and Going Places.

From July 17 – October 19, 2003, the Bard Graduate Center presented Thomas Jeckyll: Architect and Designer. This was the first exhibition of the work of the British architect Thomas Jeckyll (1827–81), who excelled in the design of Anglo-Japanese metalwork and furniture. Among the least understood (and most tragic) figures of the Victorian design reform movement, Jeckyll was also an important designer of public and private architecture. Watch The Peacock Room.



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