In Order to Form a More Perfect Likeness: Frederick Douglass, Photography and the Image of the Nation

Laura Wexler, The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation Seminar in New York and American Material Culture
Wednesday, November 28, 2012

In this lecture, entitled “In Order to Form a More Perfect Likeness: Frederick Douglass, Photography and the Image of the Nation,” Laura Wexler discusses Frederick Douglass’s little-known contributions to a theory of photography as political action. The famed African American abolitionist was one of the most photographed men of the nineteenth-century. But his engagement with photography extended well beyond his numerous, widely circulated portraits.

Laura Wexler is Professor of American Studies, Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Director of The Photographic Memory Workshop at Yale University. She also directs the Photogrammar Project, an interactive web-based open source visualization platform for the 160,000 photographs created by the federal government from 1935 to 1943 under the Farm Securities Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).



Back to Top